Amethyst

Amethyst

Amethyst

A while ago I told you the Emerald was my favourite gemstone but running a very close second, perhaps even neck and neck, is the Amethyst stone meaning you would need a photo finish (like the horse race) to see which one was ahead if only by a nose. I do love the colour of the emerald but my absolute favourite colour is purple. And because purple has always been synonymous with royalty I began to wonder why the Amethyst didn’t have equal billing or status with the emerald, sapphire, ruby, and diamond (the so-called big 4). The Amethyst has also been relegated to semi-precious status. But why this is, given its undisputed royalty connection re its colour, prompted me to find the reason for the disparity. I now know why, but first I want to tell you what I have learned about the Amethyst.

 

Amethyst History

 

The Amethyst – February’s birthstone – was known in antiquity, by both the ancient Greeks and ancient Egyptians. And, like many gems, the Amethyst was thought to have special powers. The ancient Greeks, for example, believed the Amethyst was an amulet that would protect a person from poisoning, and prevent intoxication and drunkenness. Then, in medieval Europe, soldiers wore the Amethyst to keep them cool-heated in battle and heal them if they were wounded. To the ancient Egyptians the Amethyst had the power to guard against feelings of fear and guilt. And, in more recent history, the Amethyst was thought to bring good dreams if placed under the pillow and when rubbed across the forehead would cure a headache. As for colour or hue, the Amethyst is more than just that seductive, glorious purple colour because its primary colours are a light pinkish violet to a deep purple and possible secondary colours, which are light dependant, of red and/or blue. The ideal grade is the Deep Siberian or Deep Russian Amethyst whose primary colour is 75-80% purple with 15-20% being the blue or red secondary colour. These violet hues that pair or match up so well with other colours – pink, green, white, turquoise – are great favourites with visionary designers from clothes to carpets. And, did you know that violet in Hinduism, represents Crown Chakra, which is the body’s coordination centre and universal source of energy? Clearly, a good reason to invest in an amethyst, preferably at at LL Private Jewellers where you will find an impressive array of these beautiful gems; and wearing something in a violet colour would also be beneficial.

 

And, to set your mind at rest, I assure you the cost of an amethyst is not astronomical like many other gems because it is found in abundance in many parts of the world: Brazil; Uruguay; Zambia; S. Africa; South Korea; Austria; Thunder Bay, Ontario; Texas, and Yellowstone National Park.

 

Once upon a time way back in the 17th century, the Amethyst did have equal status with emeralds, sapphires, and diamonds and was therefore labelled a precious gemstone. But the discovery of so many large deposits worldwide was the Amethyst’s undoing, so to speak, for that designation because that abundance or availability drove the Amethyst’s price down to render it a semi-precious gem. The exception is the extremely rare Deep Russian or Deep Siberian Amethyst whose value will depend on collectors’ demands and how they perceive it when it is discovered. This appears to be the rule of thumb for valuing a gemstone.

LL Private Jewellers sell fine quality of amethysts of all shapes and sizes. For more information about amethysts please contact us.